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July 2011 Archives

  • Rhonda from Middleton, WI

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 2:01 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: If service is awful I will reduce the tip to 10 to15 percent. Otherwise, 20 percent, always. If service is fantastic, it will go over 20 percent.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: My husband was a waiter for many, many years.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Philip from Madison, WI

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 2:00 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: Fifteen percent standard service and 20 percent for superior service.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: My children working in hospitality industry have made me a bit more generous to others.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I am bald since chemo therapy, so no haircuts or barbers to tip. I don’t tip doctors and nurses either, but I have bought gifts for nurses when treatment s over.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Annalise from St. Croix Falls, WI

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:59 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: Tipping, to me, is highly personal. The quality and level of service greatly weighs in my decision on how much to tip.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: As someone who has spent summer waiting on tables — something everyone should do at some point — it is easy to see if the quality of service is related to the actual person giving the service, or things outside their control (i.e., the kitchen not keeping up). On the receiving end, however, I can say that nine times out of 10, the people who tip the least are the people who demand the most.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: A tip from someone has a lifetime spend in the service industry: Avoid being a “verbal tipper.” Verbal tipping is something that happens when people don’t want to tip for their service. Though it can be both conscious and unconscious behavior, it’s equally irritating. The verbal tipper will sprinkle comments about how great the atmosphere is, how great the food is, how delightful the service is, and will then proceed to leave a 5 to 10 percent tip for their server. No verbal tipping. Your face will be remembered and you can guarantee that every server in the joint now knows that you are a verbal tipper. Your service will always suffer from that day forward.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Blaise from Grantsburg, WI

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:58 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: I start with a specific percentage (20 percent if it is a local restaurant where I may be known or if I am likely to return, 15 percent if neither applies). I adjust up or down a few percentage points based on the quality of service and round the total to an even dollar amount.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: Hearing from waitresses who are dependent on the income has made me gradually more generous over the years.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Kat from Milwaukee, WI

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:57 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: Yes. I tip $1 per drink with alcohol and specialty coffees, but 20 percent on all other food and beverages. With the alcohol or coffee, the person making the beverage is the one serving me. With food, this is not the case.

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: In general, I tip 20 percent on a food bill. If the server was slow while the restaurant was slow or rude, then the tip goes down to 10 percent. I also have special dietary needs and if I request something, but find that I can’t eat it because my request was ignored, I will not tip at all if the problem isn’t fixed to my satisfaction. Keeping foods which cause or incite illness out of my dish is a server’s job. However, if the service is excellent, which my server offering to talk to the chef or look thing up his/her self, then my tip will go up to 25 percent, or as high as 50 percent on a small bill.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I worked as a hotel maid in high school and I can’t tell you how much more bearable a tip would make that horrible job. Cleaning up after strangers who not only take your job for granted, but go out of their way to make it difficult or disgusting (i.e. excrement on the floors, dirty diapers on the beds, mud on the bed spreads, etc) takes far more energy than most people realize. Those maids are generally paid minimum wage. A tip is the least I can do to show my appreciation for their work and tolerance.

    I also have friends who wait tables and cut hair and I’ve worked in retail. The general public, myself included, fails on most counts to realize just how rude we are to the people who serve us. A tip doesn’t make things better, but it certainly does help to rectify the wrongs we do.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Rob from South Milwaukee, WI

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:56 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: I think because I get the bill for the whole meal and drinks are one at a time, I tip differently.

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: A base percentage, which goes up if the service is above average.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I used to work for tips (bus boy and pizza delivery).

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: My haircuts are from the local chain, so they are only $15. I always tip $5 because I budget $20.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Dominic from Madison, WI

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:55 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: The service definitely factors into my decision. At restaurants this is especially the case. I try to tip only on their service though, and not the quality of the food. The server should not be penalized for the kitchen’s mistakes! Also, if it is a place I frequent or someone I have built up a relationship, I tip more. I tip my barber more for instance, because I know her well and always like the job she does.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I’m a college student who has worked in the service industry for 6 years, and whose family comes from working in restaurants. I myself have depended on tips for part of my paycheck, and I’ve talked to servers about this as well. When on the receiving end, of course we want bigger tips, and they have said the old standard of 20 percent is not enough now with inflation etc… However, because I have worked in restaurants, when I go out I expect good service and I know that at good restaurants it can be done every time, so if I don’t get it, I don’t tip as well. I have never stiffed someone though, that would take a lot. When I get great service, I’m happy to tip.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: My mood and how much money I have in the bank also affect my tips. If I just got a paycheck of course I’m much more likely to add a couple bucks on. I believe, especially as a service worker, that if you tip well, good tips will come back to you. I think everyone should have to work some sort of service job in their life; it would make everyone a lot more understanding.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Syeeda from Milwaukee, WI

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:54 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: I start with a certain percentage and either add or subtract from that depending on the service.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I think that most people who have never worked in a service industry job that pays a very low wage don’t really think about the people who provide their services and how those people get paid. It doesn’t occur to your average person that works a 9 to 5 salaried position that their tips are what that person uses to pay his/her bills.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Kevin from River Falls, WI

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:53 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: Yes. Depends on the difficulty, such as distance carried, crowds, size of group, etc…

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Quality of service is a big factor: received all items requested, attention to service, friendliness, not overbearing by asking questions too often.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping habits?

    A: Wait staff that forgets your order, served after an extremely long wait, served cold when it is supposed to be hot, served warm when it is supposed to be cold. Wrong drink served, bad-tasting drink, extremely weak alcoholic drink, drink or food with insect in it, food with a strip of plastic in it, salad with a live cockroach in it…

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: Food cleanliness is a priority.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Cathy from Hager City, WI

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:52 AM

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I used to work at a luncheonette for my first job. I tried really hard to serve my customers and my tips showed it. So if I get good service I tend to tip more because it encourages the server to think of customer service.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Dennis from Milwaukee, WI

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:51 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: Yes. Bartenders have to deal with drunks all night.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I generally go by percentage, but particularly outstanding or truly terrible service will sway me.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I had several good friends in college that waited tables or tended bar, and they helped me appreciate the extent to which some employees are dependent upon tips.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Brian from Franklin, WI

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:50 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: Prompt service gets me to give more. Above and beyond gets more. I will go up to 30 percent if the service, food and attention were extremely great.

    Miserable waitresses/waiters get 8 to10 percent, and a note as to why, and a discussion with the manager. Great service means that the servers are interested in all aspects of the meal or service.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Joe from Milwaukee, WI

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:49 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: Yes. About half the amount if it’s for booze, because it’s way over-priced to begin with and second, a lot of inebriated folks tip to excess.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Quality of service always affects tipping. My rule of thumb is 20 percent in restaurants, 10 percent in bars. For restaurants, if service is fair to good, 20 percent; if excellent, 25 percent; if poor to mediocre, 0 to 10 percent.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Barbara from Shorewood, WI

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:48 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: I usually consider it to be 15 to 20 percent. Better service (this is often subjective) warrants a bigger tip and I will often round up. Poorer service may result in rounding down.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Actually, it is based on poor math and embarrassment. I don’t want to take out a calculator and I use a tip card discreetly so it is not obvious that I am trying to figure it out. I do think that I am a little on the stingy side, so I try to round up to a full dollar amount when in doubt.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Belinda from Spokane, WA

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:47 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Quality of service matters. If it is lousy, I will only tip 10 percent on a meal. If service is good to excellent, I will increase my tip towards 20 percent. I also tip more when I am with a large party, or someone asks for special service, like my vegan brother does.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: For the most part, I tip the same way my parents did. The only time I spend money on tips is when I (rarely) eat out at a restaurant. I know that tips are part of the income for underpaid wait staff, and are usually shared with other members of the staff as well. If someone is working behind a counter, and I stand and wait for service, I see no need to add a tip to the price of the food (coffee shop, takeout).

    Nobody ever offered me a tip when I worked as a cashier at McDonalds when I was 16. When I have my haircut at a discount hair salon, I do not add a tip, because the salon sets the price, and I do not choose who cuts my hair. Other haircuts are so expensive that I can’t afford to add a tip. If they really need more money, they could price their services appropriately.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Joel from Seattle, WA

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:46 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: I usually tip 20 percent in a restaurant. If service was bad, I will tip as low as 10 percent. If it was exceptional, as high at 25 percent.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I feel like being a good tipper makes you look good on dates.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Billy from Bridport, VT

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:45 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: More for alcohol. Alcohol’s a drug and that’s different.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Sorry I’m not much statistical help. I tip differently in different situations, but always more than is called for. When I’m flush, overtip a lot. When I’m broke, I overtip a little. 20 percent is easy to calculate, and it’s a minimum I try to adhere to. I try not to let my associates see my over-tipping. I engage with servers more than most people do. I tip where others don’t; I like to cheerfully say, “Close enough!” at fast food joints, toll booths, gas stations, quick-stops, and split before I get an argument. It’s part of my personality. I also tell jokes, compliment people, bring sunshine to every exchange. It’s part of my commitment to being overly outgoing. I’m in my 44th year of this mode of behavior. So far so good.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: My annual income has varied (and continues to vary) between $200,000 and $7,000. My happiness levels don’t seem to be affected by my income, but I know others don’t share this good fortune. When I look at people working, it seems that they are working hard for not much money. I know how good it feels to get a few bucks when it is needed or desired.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I can’t recommend my practices to others. It must seem to many that I am trying to impress, a blowhard, insecure, trying to buy friendship. That’s the downside of my commitment to strong engagement. I accept this; one cannot be extremely outgoing and cool at the same time. So I gave up on being cool.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Nate from Arlington, VT

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:44 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: The quality of service is key. We usually do 20 percent on average, but will easily go up or down for above or below service. Also, for certain things, the external factors will influence tipping: how frazzled the person looks, how well we get to know them, how far above a beyond they go and what life is like in general.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping habits?

    A: On cruises we can get to know our servers or stewards well. If the service is excellent, that is expected and normal. Last summer our two servers made a personal connection throughout the trip. They got a larger tip. Even the maitre’d made his presence known to us personally. He got a tip.

    We had a cabbie recently and he spoke to us a people, not as just fares. We shared stories and he gave us helpful advice and insight. He went out of his way- even though it was minor, it was nice- especially when we are on vacation and want to feel relaxed.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: My wife has opened my eyes to the realities of people’s lives and how tipping can make a difference. When we visit Disney World, she takes pre-made envelopes with stickers and kind words already written and made out with the tip inside- from the shuttle driver to the housekeeper. We often tip more for more personal reasons.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • L.C. from Charlottesville, VA

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:43 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Minimum is 10 percent. If the service is really bad, then nothing. If the service is outstanding I give tips up to 30 percent.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping habits?

    A: Where I am from - the tipping was always just little extra. Round up the bill, give some more for superb service. In the U.S., it is expected and that bothers me. If you make my restaurant experience fabulous, I am generous. If you help me with my suitcases, I am happy to give you some cash but otherwise if you just do your job - like pour drip coffee into a paper cup and hand it to me over counter, sorry, I don’t tip there.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Susan from Winchester, VA

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:42 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Quality and duration always make a difference in affecting the percentage. Good service must be rewarded and bad service will get only a minimal tip and a phone call or personal complaint to management

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I was a waitress and know how hard that job is. I also was once married to a cab driver so I know how difficult that job can be.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: A discussion of tip “pooling” would be interesting. Also, why do some employers think this is the best way to “pay” their employees?

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Dianne from Abilene, TX

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:41 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I always tip at least 20 percent in restaurants and similar situations and more for good service.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: As an accountant, I understand that all employees for whom tips are a part of their pay can be paid less than minimum wage because employers are allowed to consider tips as part of the wages paid. They also are seldom allowed to work 30 hours or more per week, to keep from having to provide them with benefits, so they need at least that minimum tip to make what most of us consider a base pay. Even for poor service, I don’t leave without tipping and tip at least 20 percent, because I would have given a better tip with good service.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I really think people who are professionals in the employment fields where tipping is an issue should be given more opportunity to express how important tips are and how and why they strive to earn them. I never fail to tip anyone — hairdresser, manicurist, wait server, etc… — at least a minimum of 20 percent, not because I am well-off or have money to spare, but I consider it part of the minimum earnings of those people, and add to it for better service.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Glenda from Austin, TX

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:40 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Service makes a difference, but generally only up or down a dollar or two. I always tip at least $2 when I sit down at a restaurant, even if I only get a small snack or a cup of coffee, as I kind of think of it as ‘table rent’ for taking up a space that could be earning a server more. At bars, I tip $1 per item ordered, and since I tend to go more for the $3.50 beer than the $14 specialty, the tip is higher percent-wise. I don’t get my hair cut, but didn’t tip back when I used to. At hotels, the porter tends to get $1 per item, not a flat rate.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I’ve never worked for tips, but I think of tipping as a modern way of fulfilling the commandment to leave some of the harvest in the field for gleaners. The money has been earned through labor, and it’s only a small amount to me.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: It is sad that tips are so important to people in service industries in the U.S. It seems more fair to figure in the labor to the prices for goods and services, which is more common outside the U.S.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Clayton from Allen, TX

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:39 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: Yes. I typically go to the same bar all the time with the same bar tender. I tip more, often as high as 30 to 50 percent with a minimum of $10. I consider it an investment for great service.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Based on quality of service, time, and whether or not I frequent that location and server. For repeat business, good tips are an investment. That server will recognize you and provide great service. If I am tipping a stranger that I am not likely to ever see again, I tip based on quality of service and how long I am there. If I only spend $15 on 2 beers and nachos, but I am sitting at the bar for three hours watching the news or a game, I consider that I took up that seat for three hours and I tip something more like $10 to $15 instead of just a percent off of the $15 bill.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I get the best drinks at bars I frequent at great pricing. The owner knows me as a result and I often get free drinks or shots or upgrades.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Robbie from McKinney, TX

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:38 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I have waited tables and bartended for years, and I still do it part time so I’m very biased. I am very aware of the hard work and rejection involved in waiting tables, and in most cases the wait staff is responsible for paying for their own uniform cleaning, as well as host, bar, and bus staff, whether they get tipped or not. Quality of service is important, but I still tip well even if service is strained. I tend not to tip at places where you walk to a counter to order, and get your own food.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I have had amazing service and terrible service in my life, and if someone is hustling doing a physical job, I am going to compensate them as much as I can.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: It’s frustrating that people don’t realize that people that work in service in many cases derive their entire income from tips from customers. I am able to make the same amount of money I’ve always made in restaurants because my employer raised the prices on food and drink items, in response to higher food costs. The unfortunate downside is that people can eat at these sorts of restaurants less and less, so that affects how much a person can make.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Jonathan from Forney, TX

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:37 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: If I’m only drinking alcohol I might tip the bartender a bit more

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I usually try to give a certain percentage and then will give more for service that goes above and beyond.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I’m always annoyed that many friends I have who wait tables say that Sunday afternoon is the worst day for tips. Typically it’s the “church crowd” and they always say they’re the worst tippers. I’ve even heard numerous times that people will come (supposedly) after church, be demanding about their food, leave a lousy tip and a Gospel tract. I want to change that - 7 days a week - so I try to give at least a decent tip even if the service is horrible - and I try to give an even better tip if someone in my party was a pain to the wait staff.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I’d be curious to know if certain days or crowds of people are better or worse and if different demographics tip differently in general.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Brian from Cedar Park, TX

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:36 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: Depends. If I’m at a bar or other place whose predominant reason for existence is tasty beer, I tend to tip a dollar or two per drink. This stems from the admittedly naive belief that eventually I might get comped a beer since I’m a good customer. In 18 years of good drinking, this has happened exactly once.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: It depends on the type and location of service. If I’m at a nice hotel and the room is well cleaned out (trash emptied and so forth), I’ll tip $5 or more for the housekeeping service. If it’s more of a dive or budget motel, $2 to $3 is more likely. At a restaurant, my standard tip amount is 20 percent. If the service is particularly top notch, I’ll go over that. I’ll also go over that if we had a large party, if we were obnoxious, or if we ordered almost nothing but sat at the table for 2 hours. In such cases I’ve been known to leave 200-300 percent tips - I’m paying not just for the food, but for the service, after all. I’ve also had friends who’ve been wait staff, and am aware of what a lousy job it can be some days. Even if the service is absolutely lousy, I would find it difficult to drop below a 10 percent tip - everyone has off days and tips are a part of the salary.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: Well I alluded to knowing waiters, that’s definitely a factor. I also just see it as part of the cost of having someone else do something for you that you’re too lazy to do for yourself - so that should cost money since I’m not spending my time. I do not believe the size of my tip really has dramatic impacts on the future service in general, but I do believe it’s part of my responsibility as a customer to pay for the service I have received. And I do believe that if I’m a regular somewhere and I tip well I may get slightly preferential treatment. On the flip side, if I’m a regular somewhere and don’t tip acceptably, I run the risk of retribution.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Chris from Lebanon, TN

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:35 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: If the service is bad, I do not tip. If the service warrants a tip, I base it on a percentage.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I’m a corporate trainer in a large national restaurant company. I expect a certain level of service from our employees. It’s just as fair I hold others to that expectation.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Jeremiah from Elmwood, TN

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:34 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: No. I tip the same for food as I do for alcohol if there is service involved. The bartender is just as deserving as wait staff, but not more so. At my usual rate of tipping, I think it is generous enough.

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: The better the service, the better the tip, to a point. I will rarely tip below 15 percent for food service, which is usually the only service I use on a regular basis that I tip for. I won’t go below 15 percent usually, because most service staff aren’t paid even a minimum wage and depend on tips to get their compensation up to an okay amount. So if I’m happy with the service, I will almost always tip 20, 25, or even 30 percent.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: When I was a broke college student, I had a class with a young lady that worked at a Sonic fast food restaurant. She was a car hop and complained enough about usually not getting tips at all and it has always stuck in my mind when it comes to all sorts of personal services. My older brother has worked as a bartender and waiter for long periods of time and that has influenced me as well to tip more and at a higher rate. I also had a job delivering newspapers when I was 13 to 15 years old. It was only a twice per week newspaper, but I took pride in the job and never really expected tips. It was great when tipped, though, because usually the tip amount would exceed my cut of the revenue for delivering the paper.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I think it would be good to address why some industries are allowed to pay less than minimum wages to service staff, essentially foisting a tipping regime upon customers. I’ve heard the one argument that if they paid staff more the food and other things would cost more, but in the end with tips, it would probably cost the same. Is the reasoning behind it that customers feel more involved somehow in the process by tipping?

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Amanda from Providence, RI

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:33 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: If I got the level of service I expect, that is great. I tip 20 percent. If the service was bad, or the cab ride scary or deliberately circuitous, I tip 15 percent.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: My sister worked for many years as a waitress - I’m a better tipper than many as a result, but not as generous as she’d like me to be!

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I would like to hear whether tipping has changed over the years (my parents always tipped 15 percent) and how people deal with buffets!

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Ned from Doylestown, PA

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:32 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: I generally tip heavy 20 percent-ish unless the service was crappy. If the service isn’t good, I might be annoyed but still tip at least 15 percent. If the meal stinks but the service is good, I still tip 20 percent. I know that wait staff are only making like $3 to $4 per hour.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping habits?

    A: I have worked in the industry myself and understand that the salary is based on tips. I appreciate a service-person that goes over-the-top to make me happy at a nice meal.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: Please address “tip jars” at sandwich and ice cream shops. I don’t get them! The employees are making minimum wage, if not more. It’s not the same as waiters or bartenders. They aren’t serving me over a one to two hour period. They are just making and handing me a sandwich in 5 minutes flat. I have friends in the service industry who tell me I am wrong. They say because it’s a “food-service” I should be tipping them. I disagree.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Kathleen from Philadelphia, PA

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:31 AM

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I was a waitress and am the daughter and sister of waitresses so I’m generally going to tip more. Bad service, however, (when it’s not due to an overly crowded section) does lead to a reduction in the tip. I wish I could state that, because I feel that a poor tip may just justify the wait person continuing to give bad service!

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Phyllis from Portland, OR

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:30 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: Quality of service only enters in if it was really bad service. Otherwise, I generally choose to pay 20 percent regardless of food or beverage, including alcohol.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: Having adult children work as baristas and knowing how helpful tips can be. I believe that it improves the quality of my life if I practice generosity, and I hope that 20 percent tipping is generous enough. Having a generous parent who modeled this tipping practice. Having adult kids notice when other adults were tipping less than 15 percent and having them comment that that did not seem to be enough for a place where they knew the wait staff and did not want to seem disrespectful.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I have much less experience with hotel room cleaning and bell hops or car valets. If I have stayed in a hotel room for a week, I am apt to leave a $20 bill on the counter as a tip. Valets at restaurants/public places I usually pay $2 as a tip when they bring my car. The couple of places where this happens regularly (urban hospital and restaurant with challenging parking), I do not pay for parking but just the tip for valet. I look forward to seeing what others may suggest for these experiences.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Richard from Portland, OR

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:29 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: Twenty percent for restaurant bills. More for unusually good service. Taxis would vary but, depending on the amount, I normally would work for 20 percent, but it’s not a hard and fast calculation.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: Working as a busboy during summer holidays.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: How much I tip a hotel maid depends on length of stay and quality of service.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Carl from Enterprise, OR

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:28 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: More, ‘cause I’m not sober

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: My Dad grew up with 10 percent being normal, then they switched to 15 percent. He always mentioned that.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Thomas from Portland, OR

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:27 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: Twenty percent is the baseline for most services. Good service (or low prices) can warrant up to 30 percent. Rarely will I tip less than 15 percent on a restaurant tab, and only if the service was atrocious.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I know several people in the food service industry and realize that they get almost no hourly wage, so tips are their livelihood. We’ve all had bad days at work, and I try to remember that when I get sub-par service.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Paul from Portland, OR

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:26 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: No. I can’t afford to tip extravagantly, generally speaking. Alcohol is a dollar-per-drink tip for me.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I generally tip at 20 percent as a baseline. Great service earns a dollar or two more from me. Poor service shaves a dollar or two less.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I’ve worked as a barista before. I’ve also generally never had the discretionary spending ability to really avail myself of luxury services where most of these tipping scenarios happen, so that shapes my assumptions about this, too.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Bill from Oklahoma City, OK

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:25 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: A minimum of 15 percent, short of horrible service. Usually around 20 percent rounded up to next dollar. Higher if service is extensive or above the call of duty.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I worked as a waiter when I was first married and we were still in college.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Carol from Enid, OK

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:25 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: Level and quality matter. If really good I give a premium. Also if it is in my hometown or I go there often I tip more. I tend to tip a higher percentage for smaller bills but I try to tip at least 20 percent.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I have had a good life and I want to share so that others can know they are appreciated.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Robert from Sylvania, OH

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:25 AM

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I worked for a restaurant when I was young. I’ve been up against the wall, so I know what it’s like. I have known some very good places where real adults work to support themselves.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I don’t believe in tipping. I believe the price should reflect a living wage. I know it doesn’t, so I tip, but not for services that aren’t delivered to me. You most certainly should not tip when you pick up food or drinks at the counter, not even in a coffee shop. Especially not at an expensive coffee shop like Starbucks or Seattle’s Best.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Stephanie from Montor, OH

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:24 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: I try to tip based on 20 percent of the bill, no matter what. If the service is good, I will tip more. I think you should tip at least at the 20 percent level because you are being served, even if it is bad service. The types of jobs that receive tips usually have low wages and the tips can really make a difference to that person.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I delivered newspapers working my way through college and really had many of my customer reward me for my customer service skills and hard work. I feel that when someone is waiting on you it should been acknowledged.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I do not usually tip at coffee drive-thrus or when I pick up a carry-out order. What I will do is, if I have extra money for the week, I will put the change from my order in the jar. I never do it as just the change. I mean if I have an order for $2.98, I will use a 5.00 and leave the change. I think when people leave the change of pennies or a couple of quarters, it is an insult.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Evan from Dayton, OH

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:23 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: My first few jobs were all in food service. After that experience, I now always tip more than my peers, and always based on the level of service received (with an understanding that it’s not always the server’s fault). But, it also helps that I am now at a point in life where I can afford to tip more.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Cathalina from Lakewood, OH

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:22 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: Twenty to 25 percent at the bar. There’s more personalized service there than at a table.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: The level and quality of service make a difference. I start at 20 percent and then lower it to 15 percent or 10 percent if service is poor. Twenty-five percent for an exceptional experience.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: Excellent service. When servers go the extra mile to ensure I have a great experience makes me feel I want to tip more than for someone who is just going through the motions.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • David from Bowling Green, OH

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:21 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: Yes! The bartender gets tipped well and I get psychotherapy.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Quality and level of service matter, as do number of coworkers sharing in the tips (busboy, cook, etc…) Also, if the service provider is the proprietor, I tip less than for an employee working for wages.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I am a cab driver working for a company that bills the client companies, so the passengers do not pay me and so I rarely get tipped beyond a cup of coffee.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Paige from Brooklyn, NY

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:20 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: Generally, I tip 20 percent on average. It will fluctuate for exceptionally good or bad service.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: After having worked in restaurants and coffee shops, I tend to tip higher because of my own experience with bad tippers and knowing about everything that comes into that work experience. In addition, the knowledge of how much tipping supplements the staff’s income (in many cases) has an impact on my tipping attitudes.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: There are restaurants in my home town with signs “No Wretched Tipping,” which is taken to mean that the reason the prices are so high here is that we pay our wait staff $8 an hour, not the usual $2.35. People still tip at these places, and based on higher prices, so the employees get the best of both worlds.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Lydia from New York, NY

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:19 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: Yes, I tip a fixed amount. $1 to $2 per drink regardless of cost. It’s a fixed amount of labor as opposed to the waiter, who continues to interact.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Quality of service is an important consideration. The lowest I’ll go is 5 to10 percent if the service is really bad.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: Awareness of how poorly wait staff and drivers are paid and how much they rely on tips for their salaries.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Matt from Round Lake, NY

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:18 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Always 20 percent. If the service is unbelievably good or bad, it may affect the tip up or down.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I work in theatre, so I know a lot of waiters.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Dave from Albany, NY

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:17 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I tip according to how difficult I perceive the work to be and how much I perceive the server to earn. So, if I think someone doesn’t earn much and they are a waitress or waiter, I will tip 20 percent. At a coffee shop, I will tip less, because I perceive that the job is easier.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I’ve worked in the service industry and I know that the work is hard and underpaid.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I rarely stay at hotels because of the cost. I’ve never tipped for haircuts because I did not know it was a common practice. But I started cutting my own hair eight years ago, so that’s a non-issue now.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Eric from Las Vegas, NV

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:16 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: Yes. In Las Vegas, drinks are comped if you’re gambling.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I tip a higher percentage in a diner than I do in an upscale restaurant. The server works just as hard and has no say in the relative cost of the meal.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I’ve never been sure how or how much to tip at a teppanyaki table. The chef is also your server; but chefs generally don’t get tips.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Tara from Malaga, NJ

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:16 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: Yes, I usually tip a little less for each item ordered because I know I will more than likely get a few drinks during the course of an outing.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I only use percentages in the following circumstances: 1) as the minimum amount a tip should be (for example, I know I never leave less than a 20 percent tip at a restaurant), and 2) when I don’t like the service, I tip the minimum based on the standard percentage.

    The level and quality of service always impacts what I leave - I have been driven to leave as much as a 50 percent or larger (depending on the size of the bill) tip for really exceptional service, because I feel that exceptional service is such a rarity these days. I always appreciate a service-provider’s sense of humor and wit, so I’m likely to tip more for someone who has a good personality and isn’t afraid to actually talk to their customers.

    But I have a minimum threshold, too, so even if I hate the service, I have never been motivated to leave less than the acceptable percentage because I know that service-providers have bad days, too, and that they earn much of their livelihood from tips. (I deal with bad service in non-financial ways, like complaining to management in serious cases or just letting it go and walking away from the situation.)

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I used to bartend and wait tables and I know how much of my take-home pay was made of tips. I also just respect the fact that service-providers usually work hard, even if they’re not necessarily great at providing exemplary service - it’s hard to be on your feet all day and to deal with rude and ungrateful customers throughout your shift.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Patrick from East Windsor, NJ

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:15 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: Yes. Bartenders and waiters make about $2.15 an hour and depend on tips as part of their wage. They also have to put up with an exorbitant amount of nonsense on a daily basis. I know this because I’ve waited tables and dated many a bartender.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Mostly as a percent of the bill. The quality of the service does play a role in what percent I tip. I always tip my bartender and waiter/waitress something, regardless of whether the service was poor, but not nearly as much. Poor service gets10 percent.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I’ve been a waiter both at hole-in-the-wall diners and at more upscale places. It is not, however, my profession.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I rarely, if ever, put any money in a tip jar. I feel that it’s akin to panhandling. But if something extra special happens — like today when I asked if those fresh-from-the-oven sugar cookies were for sale at a local catering/deli shop, and I was sold a few of them (warm delicious goodness) — I did put money in the tip jar. They didn’t have to do that. And it made my day.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Nicole from Harrison, NJ

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:14 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: Yes, a dollar per drink. If I am already paying three or four times the cost of buying a beer at a store, I am not going to also tip several dollars per drink.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: If the service at a restaurant is good I tip 20 percent, but if it’s really good or bad the tip will go up or down accordingly.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I’ve worked in service positions before so I realize they can be difficult jobs, but I also know that, as a server, there is no reason to ever be rude or disgruntled to the person you’re serving right off the bat. If they are jerks though, it’s fine for a servers to stick up for themselves.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Sam from Roselle Park, NJ

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:13 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: It depends not only on a percentage, but what the service is and how much work the person I am tipping is actually doing. For example if I order a 20 pies from a pizza place, the delivery guy does not do anywhere near enough to earn 20 percent of the big bill. I might give him a few bucks then. But my barber does all the work and receives only a small percentage back in his pay, so I give him almost a 50 percent tip.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I usually go by how my grandparents have tipped in the past.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Mark from Rahway, NJ

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:12 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Base tip is probably a percentage in most cases. Taking into account service might raise it a bit. Though with cabs, I don’t seem to think in percentages. I usually round up and maybe add $1.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I never understood the phenomenon of the tip jar at Starbucks that seemed to start 12 to 15 years ago. That spawned more tip jars at DD, and beyond, and now it seems everywhere I turn there’s a tip jar, even the tow truck operator/mechanic who took all of 12 seconds to jimmy my car open the one time I locked my keys inside years ago (that’s probably when I really began noticing). Maybe I’m jaded from my years of working at Wendy’s as a teen where I slaved over hot fryers — sans tip jar.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Hilary from Meriden, NH

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:11 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: Quality of service is the key for me. If it’s really good, I have been known to leave 30 percent. I also tip maids well if they do a good job cleaning our room. Ordinary cleaning gets $5 per day. Great cleaning gets $10 or $15 per day.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I have been a waitress and I cleaned offices for a living during college.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: If the traffic is really bad, and the taxi driver is really good, polite and helpful I’ll give $15 to $20 tip. If it’s just a few blocks and takes 5 to 10 minutes and no luggage is involved, it’s just $5.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Joe from Nashua, NH

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:10 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I start at 20 percent and work down based on quality of service (taking into consideration whether that service is on account of the server or the cook). I may also increase over 20 percent if service was genuinely exceptional.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I’ve delivered pizza and worked at a restaurant for tips.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I might be more generous to taxi drivers if I had not had so many bad experiences (self-tipping, stealing credit card information, “wrong turns” that extended the length of the drive).

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Jill from Deering, NH

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:09 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: Yes, I usually tip at least 20 percent for food (rounding up), but if I’m buying single drinks at a bar I usually tip a dollar per drink, which is between 15 and 20 percent.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: For most things, I calculate 20 percent and decide from there. If the service was especially friendly or helpful, I will usually give it a healthy round up and tip closer to 25 percent. I usually give people the benefit of the doubt and it takes a lot for me to reduce a tip, but if the service was extremely poor or unfriendly I will go down to 10 percent or less. I rarely leave no tip in an industry that depends on it.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: Some of my first part-time jobs involved getting tips, but they were a bonus and we didn’t depend on them as part of our salary. Most of my knowledge of tipping probably came from my mom and my dad, who both always treated service people with respect and tipped well.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I’ve never used bell hop services. And for hotel room cleaning services I never know what to do. I usually put out my ‘Do Not Disturb’ tag the whole time I’m there because I don’t need my room to be serviced during the few days I’m there. At a smaller, independently owned hotel I usually leave about $10 for the cleaner, but that’s usually nowhere near 20 percent of the bill. At large chain hotels I usually don’t leave anything unless I got some kind of special service.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Daniel from Windham, NH

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:08 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: Yes. I usually tip $1 for the first drink and don’t tip again until the fourth drink.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: The level and quality definitely factor in, though I rarely tip less or more than 15 percent for dinner. I deviate from 15 percent depending on extraordinarily poor or excellent service.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: People should be paid a living wage and tipping should be for excellent service, not mediocre service.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: Get rid of mandatory tipping. We should do as the Europeans do. I like to tip but I don’t like to feel obligated to do it.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Jeanne from Concord, NH

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:07 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: As a person who depended upon tips in the restaurant industry, I tend to tip at least 20 percent or more. Quality of service only increases it, but I know what it’s like to have a bad day. In New Hampshire, servers made $2.15 an hour from the restaurant that employed them (I’m not sure what it is now. I think it is still well below minimum wage.)

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Kevin from Durham, NC

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:06 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: Service quality is very much a consideration. I average around 18 to 20 percent but can go higher or lower for exceptionally good or bad service.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I worked for four years in a food service job that partially relied on tips.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: It’s definitely not an exact science. I’ll typically shoot for a percentage but round up or down to a convenient dollar amount.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Denny from Hillsborough, NC

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:05 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I know that one should usually tip servers 15 percent. I tip anywhere from 10 to 25 percent, depending on how well they did their job and how much I feel I can afford to tip. Sometimes I do the math to figure out an exact amount, but I then round it up or down a little - for example, if my meal with tax was $16.41, I may tip $2.59, which is more than 15 percent but makes the total an even $19. Or I may make it an even $20 if I’m feeling more generous.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: Many of my family members have worked in restaurants, so I try to tip well.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Lisa from Davidson, NC

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:04 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: Yes. I generally tip bartenders in even cash increments, while for food I do a flat 20 percent because it’s on a credit card.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: As long as the service is good, I tip 20 percent. If service is bad, I tip 10 percent (because the math is easy!).

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I am a sympathetic tipper, because so many friends have been wait-staff or musicians in clubs and tips are a critical contribution to sustainability!

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Jacob from Durham, NC

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:03 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: I always tip 20 percent for food no matter what. Other things vary based on the quality of service. For cabs, I aim for about 15 percent, but I round to easy amounts for ease of payment, and will go up or down depending on whether the drive made me fear for my life. For coffee shops, I usually don’t tip but if I’m a regular, I’ll sometimes give them my change from my purchase or leave a dollar.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I hope you talk to UNITE HERE, the hotel workers’ union, which encourages people to tip for hotel maid service and is trying to encourage people to leave $5 a night (I think). I’d be interested to know why they’re doing this; it seems like a bad idea to move hotel work into the category of tipping.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Karen from Raleigh, NC

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:02 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: Yes, often if I am just having a drink, I will tip more than 25 percent, as 25 percent may only be $.50.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I generally tip 20 to 25 percent, and if they go out of their way, make me laugh, or just make me feel good, I have been known to tip upwards of 50 percent.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: Nothing. I just think it is the right thing to do. Outside of tipping for food service, I have had no outside experience (never saw my parents do it), so often I didn’t know I was supposed to.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Sasha from Cary, NC

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:01 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: We have small children and are needy and make a big mess, so I tip more when we go out as a family than just adults.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: Having kids and cleaning up after them is hard. They deserve a little extra for dealing with us!

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Layna from Chapel Hill, NC

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 1:00 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: I do think about the quality of service, although I have some “standard practices” as well. I tip the same for every haircut (maybe because they’re always good?), and almost always 20 percent at restaurants (unless the service is particularly atrocious). For cabs, I do think a bit about time of day and severity of traffic, but also about the ride itself, i.e. did the driver scare me silly while weaving through rush hour traffic?

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Erik from Chapel Hill, NC

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:59 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: My tips are pretty much standard regardless of the service. However, whether I return to the same establishment depends on the service.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: Consumers don’t like to tip because it’s not a fixed amount and it is not obligated. Tips should be included in the charge so that consumers are not expected to make these decisions.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Craig from St. Paul, MN

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:58 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I usually just figure 10 percent, because it’s easy, double that and then round to the nearest dollar.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I’ve worked in restaurants, and most of the people I know have as well.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Bryan from Grand Marais, MN

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:57 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: Probably a little more for alcohol to get the bartender’s attention.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I use a percentage based on the quality of service. If average, 15 percent. If great, 18 percent. If outstanding, or if I know the person, 20 percent. I live in a small town, so I know many of the servers and know it’s hard to make a living here, so I often tip 20 percent.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I worked as a kayaking guide for several years at a resort that allowed tipping but didn’t allow us to say that we could get tipped. I really appreciated the tips, because it helped pay for all my training and certifications. My wage was fairly low for the responsibility of the position. Based on conversations, many clients think that guiding isn’t really work, so they don’t see the need to tip, despite the low wage. It was a great job, but I had several hairy situations that definitely made me feel pretty underpaid. Tips would have been nice.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: You should talk to guides about tipping. Some parts of the guiding business get great tips, such as fishing guides, and some get shafted, such as hiking or paddling guides.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Graham from Owatonna, MN

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:56 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Twenty-five percent basic tip. Higher for exceptional service. 20 percent for not-so-great service.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: My friends who tip poorly are an embarrassment to me. All too often I have noticed that fellow professionals who are female are lousy tippers.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Mark from Minneapolis, MN

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:55 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: No. Alcohol is a beverage and is no different from, say, a soft drink.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Most often, tip is not dependent on level or quality of service, but if service is especially good or especially bad, it can affect how much of a tip I leave. Circumstances can also affect things (i.e., a server who is working well in a difficult situation may be more likely to get a higher tip).

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I quite dislike the idea of tips. Instead we should pay service workers a greater base salary, a livable wage, and put an end to the whole idea of tipping. It would be much more just to service workers, for one thing. I’d rather pay a bit more for my meal, hotel room, haircut, etc… than have to figure out what to tip.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Nancy from Battle Creek, MI

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:54 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: I tip less. It seems like less work.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I tend to tip close to the percentage but also consider service to round up or down. I tend to keep it between 15 and 25 percent.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I refuse to tip for takeout or coffee. I don’t tip for fast food.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Kenneth from Kalamazoo, MI

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:53 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: Yes, it depends on how long it takes to get served and how weak the drinks are or aren’t.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I will tip not more than 20 percent. Less depending on the quality and level of service. While tip stands for “to insure promptness,” I don’t care as much about promptness as I do about the rest of the dining experience.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I’ve had friends in the service industry and heard their stories.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Irene from Farmington, MI

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:52 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: If I’m at a bar, I might tip more generously overall because I base it in part on how many times the server has to return to refill my drink.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I tip in traditional, sit-down restaurants as a matter of course because I know the servers are taxed by the IRS on a presumed amount of tips. I hate tip jars at fast food restaurants and ice cream shops and don’t feel the same obligation to tip. If the service is standard I tip 15 percent and 20 percent if it’s better.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I used to work in a restaurant as a cashier where all my sisters at one time or another worked as waitresses.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Adrienne from Ann Arbor, MI

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:51 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Usually I tip the standard percentage. If someone is providing a service that is not good, I tip less, and have left zero tip if especially egregious. If someone is outstanding, I usually bump it up to 25 percent or even 30 percent. Cab rides are trickier. If it is a long trip, I usually reduce the 20 percent.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: My grandpa was a salesman and he taught me all about the restaurant business. And I have a lot of experience house-cleaning and staying at hotels- so I always tip the maid. Many people don’t, which really is pretty sad. I have had maids leave me notes that show that this makes a big difference in their life.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I travel a lot and it always astounds me that many of my colleagues had no idea they should tip the maid, even though they tip everyone else.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Rajiv from Warren, MI

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:50 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: More for mixed drinks and less for bottle opening.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I start at 15 percent of subtotal and usually add from there. In rare occasions I will subtract, and I have even left none at all for lousy service. Usually only $1 for buffet restaurants, unless other service is good.

    Q: Do you calculate tip before or after sales tax?

    A: Before, especially in Canada. (GST + PST can be 15 percent by itself!)

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: This morning in Orlando, Fla., I got a taxi from my hotel to the airport, flat rate $18. Even though it is a company-owned van, in talking with the driver I found that he was responsible for gasoline. So instead of $2 to $3, I tipped $5.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Katherine from Detroit, MI

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:49 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: I used to always tip at least 20 percent. Now I go as low as 15 percent if the service is bad. But I consider if they seem busy or if they are standing around having a conversation with a coworker when I need something. In cheap diners I never tip less than $5, even if the bill is only $10. Those ladies work their butts off for small tips.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I am a first year teacher at a Catholic school. But all through undergrad and grad school I have waited tables. In fact, I still do a couple days a week to make extra money. I make more money per hour to sling calamari and fill drinks than I do to educate children! Doesn’t that say something about our current society?

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Winthrop from North Monmouth, ME

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:48 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I tip like a former New Yorker. My usual tip would be 20 percent of the total at a restaurant. I am very conscious of tipping well if I am at a place that I wish to return to, since waiters will remember. If I’m at a bar, I tip $1 per drink. My barber in Maine charges $9 for a haircut currently. He gets a $1 tip, but he got a $2 tip when he was charging $8 a haircut because he is the only time that I use or have cash. Everything else is via a debit card.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: My father would spend lots of time adding up the total first to make sure that it was added up correctly which, as he began to have problems seeing, took longer and longer to do. He makes a point, as does my mother, of paying the tip in cash even if they charge the rest. As though you can’t trust management! I include the tip on the debit.

    No matter how bad the meal was, I have never, and would never, take it out on a waiter. Having worked as a masseur, I have received huge tips on rare occasions and have never forgotten how that made me feel. I also used to derive my session fees based on ATM’s: once they only spit out $20 bills, I made sure that my fees ‘included’ a tip, i.e. session fee $50 assumes that someone would have three twenties (and I wouldn’t have the awkwardness of having to provide change). The tip was never required. I simply made it easier to receive. Others may think the same way.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I am aware of the fact that service providers receive below minimum wage pay, so my choice to go out to eat, as opposed to using takeout, is a choice to make sure that servers benefit. I have never understood why I would be asked to tip at a Chinese restaurant if I simply place an order and pick it up. If I eat in, I tip a percentage. Ditto a coffee place. What am I tipping for? There is no other reason for their opening their doors than serving coffee for takeout. Should I tip my Hannaford’s when I make my way through the checkout?

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • John from China Village, ME

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:47 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Twenty-five percent for excellent service, 20 percent for good service, 15 percent for average service, 10 percent for below average service and $.01 for extremely poor service.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I’ve worked in the food service industry before, as did my father and my sons.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Greg from Bethesda, MD

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:46 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: The level and quality of service is a big factor in my decision. There is usually a normal minimum, but I will leave much more for better service. I usually leave a minimum, especially at restaurants, because I know the staff rely on them for income.

    Q: What personal decisions influence your tipping style?

    A: Some of my close friends have worked as waiters, and one does so professionally. Knowing the experience they have had makes me more likely to leave a larger tip, because I know the aggravation those jobs can have - as well as how much they rely on tips for their income. I’ll also make decisions based on other factors - for instance, if I spend more time sitting with friends after finishing a meal, I’ll tip more because I know we are taking up a table that might be used for other customers. Overall, I think it’s a shame that we have turned tips into something that is part of income and not a gratuity for service well done, which it should be. The way Europeans do it is much better.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Giuseppe from Germantown, MD

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:45 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: First consideration: Quality of service. Second: How much I want to impress my date.

    Q: What personal decisions influence your tipping style?

    A: I worked as a waiter, part- and full-time, at several restaurants during my life. I’ve seen first-hand how brutal it can get.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Thomas from Hagerstown, MD

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:44 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Only once in my life have I had service so terrible that it affected my tip negatively. A handful of times I’ve been so impressed I went up to 30 percent. It’s almost always just 20 percent, maybe rounded to an even dollar.

    Q: What personal decisions influence your tipping style?

    A: I tip for all but the worst service, but I still see it as basically a tax on decency and conformity.

    Just put real prices on menus and use managers to judge the quality of your staff (like in every other industry). And don’t say this can’t be done. I’m a big fan of Ingredient Restaurant, who proudly insists that you should not tip their staff, because they are trying to make great food at fair prices, and they pay a decent wage without requiring their employees to panhandle.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Marie-Louise from Quincy, MA

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:43 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: The quality of service doesn’t matter. Eighteen percent is what is usually figured in by the restaurant. If that is not automatically calculated, I tip at 20 percent because it is easy to figure in your head.

    Q: What personal decisions influence your tipping style?

    A: I follow the example of my daughters and boyfriend, and they follow my example. We all seem to trend toward a 20 percent level.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Patrice from Baldwinville, MA

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:42 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: I tip a dollar for each alcoholic beverage. I used to work in the food industry and that was the industry standard at the time.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I consider the “level” of restaurant I am dining in and whether or not the service met my expectations. At a nicer restaurant, I will tip 35 percent if the service was spot on, but if I get exceptional service at a diner, I will tip 35 percent as well. When I receive service that is less than expected, I leave the bare minimum and usually speak to the manager so that there’s no confusion about why the tip was low.

    Q: What personal decisions influence your tipping style?

    A: I worked at a diner for a summer, at Starbucks for three years and in a restaurant for a year. I learned to give great service and appreciated when I received it from others in the industry.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Pardis from Cambridge, MA

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:41 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: Yes, usually $1 per drink, unless I’m somewhere that I know has a good bartender and they are taking some effort with making the drink.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Quality of service definitely plays. It is sometimes the only way to indicate to a waitress, for example, that she/he is not doing a bad job. Even in circumstances of a bad service experience, I tip at least 10 to 15 percent based on what type of service it is. My hair dresser and my regular bartenders always get better tips because they do great work, and it is one way I can show I appreciate them. So it goes both ways.

    Q: What personal decisions influence your tipping style?

    A: My mom isn’t the best tipper. She treats the waiter or waitress badly if the food is bad, even though that particular issue is not their fault. I think as a result I tend to tip a little better, like 20 to 25 percent in a dining situation.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I would be curious if those in the service industry who get tipped badly can tell why they are getting tipped poorly.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Jeremy from Lowell, MA

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:40 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I like to tip 20 percent. When I was un- and under-employed, and did splurge to go out, I dropped it down to 15 percent, but I hated doing it.

    Q: What personal experiences influence you tipping style?

    A: I know a lot of people (including family members) who have worked in the service industry. I know it’s hard work and that food servers especially are dependent on tips.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Joshua from New Orleans, LA

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:39 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: I tip heavy at the beginning to ensure continued service. If it is a big bottle of wine, I will adjust tip depending on actual service.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I used to bar tend so I appreciate tips. I realized then that you earned it and you had to work for it.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Leah from New Orleans, LA

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:38 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: Always the same percentage, unless I have received remarkably excellent/atrocious service. Then I adjust the tip up or down accordingly. If down, I always will leave polite feedback explaining why.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Jacob from Louisville, KY

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:37 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: I tip $1 per drink at bars, but not for coffee or anywhere else. I used to be a bartender and know how hard it is

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I only account for service if it was extremely poor or extremely good.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I used to be a bartender and had more people stiff me than I care to admit.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I think tipping has a lot to do with loyalty. I used to be a bartender, so I feel like I need to take care of bartenders. I don’t tip coffee baristas the same way (even though I should)

    I never tip for carry out at restaurants because there is no service involved. It would be like tipping the checkout clerk at the grocery store.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Andrew from Louisville, KY

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:37 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Fifteen to 20 percent unless quality is really bad. Then it’s between 10 percent and nothing. If quality is exceptional, I’ve gone as high as 100 percent, even on larger tabs. I do not punish the server for low-quality food. That’s the kitchen’s fault.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: Friends’ horror stories from waiting tables. I don’t want to ever be “that guy.”

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: Tipping for me is more than just a fixed percentage. I rarely carry much cash, so often I’m stuck unable to tip as much as I’d like. Sucks for the server, but I hate to pull out a card for a $4 beer.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Mary Claire from Lexington, KY

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:37 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: We try to stick with 20 percent as a rule, but if the service is not good, that can reduce the tip a bit. If the service is extraordinary, sometimes a little more than 20 percent. However if the food is the problem, we usually still tip the server 20 percent.

    I used to wait tables during undergraduate and graduate school. Servers shouldn’t be penalized for problems in the kitchen. Sometimes kitchen staff stays in “automatic pilot,” for instance, and miss special requests by the server. If something has to be sent back, we still tip the server our normal percentage.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: During my undergraduate and graduate school years, I waited tables. The amount that is paid to servers by restaurants was far below minimum wage, so tips really are their bread and butter. I also tended bar some during those years. Bartenders have a bit of a break, because the restaurants where I worked asked the servers to “tip out” of their tips (a certain percentage was recommended) to the bartender—especially if the bartender poured a lot of drinks that night for your tables.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I don’t think some people are aware of how servers depend on tips for their living. It was really a hardship when you waited a table all evening (giving really good service) and no tip was left, or just some change. I remember one evening, I had a table stay for four hours. The daughter treated her mother to dinner and left the tip on the table. As they were leaving, the mother slipped the tip off the table and put it in her purse.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Michael from Louisville, KY

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:37 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Start at 20 percent. If the service is exceptional, I go up to 25 or 30 percent. If the service is exceptionally bad, I go down to 15 percent.

    Q: What personal experiences influence your tipping style?

    A: I worked in the service industry for a long time. Good tippers make up for all the stingy people out there (there’re more of them than you think). One good tip can make the difference in a server’s night.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Kristin from Overland Park, KS

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:37 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping style?

    A: Sometimes, I remember the lunch I had with several professional girlfriends. While working out the tip, we all felt the server deserved more than we had placed on the table so each of us added another dollar, not feeling that it was a big deal. Liking the server as much as we did, we kept adding stray singles. The result was an unexpected tip for a server we really liked, and the percentage was probably 50 percent or more of the bill. The look on his face when we left was priceless. I’ve tried to keep that in mind whenever I’m not sure whether to tip “up” or not.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: I worked in an upscale restaurant in a Big 10 college town. It was routine for collegiate supporters and media personalities to come for dinner. I learned a great deal and the expectations placed on the servers were very high. Anyone wishing to have a great dining experience should be required to learn what it takes to deliver. We tipped the chefs and dishwashers and were responsible for the quality and correctness of everything that passed from our possession to the table. One night I received a 70 percent tip on a large party of international guests. It was very rewarding. Years later as a patron, I encountered one of my managers in a new restaurant and I thanked him for what I had learned was truly excellent preparation that I had applied in new environments.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I’d be curious to know how this matter might be shifting generationally? Are people more or less generous than in the past? Are there occupations they feel more willing to tip than others, and does that represent any kind of change? What does that mean in the future? Do the kids who dry your car after a car wash think they get good tips or bad? Where does it end…?!

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Grace from Valley Fall, KS

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:36 AM

    Q: Do you calculate tip before or after tax?

    A: Before. I’m not tipping the government.

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: If the service is bad or barely there, I reduce the tip accordingly. However, if the service and quality of the presentation are great, the tip is increased. That said, we once ordered food, waited over half an hour with no drink served or silverware placed. The waitress came and asked what we had ordered, and we walked out without payment.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: We have been in some ordinary cafes with extraordinary service, and the food was cheap but freshly prepared - and have tipped more generously. Conversely, we have been in some places that thought they were something special, but the service was rude and slow, and the food was cold, nasty, and badly presented - and have left nothing or close to it.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: Consistency is important too. Some restaurants we return to on a regular basis because they know how to stick to the basics. Hot food is served hot, cold food is served cold. Water glasses are seen to once in a while, the quality of the food is checked within a few minutes, not a half hour later.

    Also, I wish they had the small hand-held credit card swiping machines here like they do in Europe. I hate to give my credit card to wait staff then waited for over 10 minutes with the card out of sight. I worry that they have left the card at the register unattended while they serve food. That will get the tip reduced as well. I don’t mind waiting a bit between courses for good food, but I don’t like my credit card where I can’t see it for so long.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Erin from New Albany, IN

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:35 AM

    Q: Do you calculate tip before or after tax?

    A: After. I know etiquette used to be before, but waiters and waitresses make practically nothing.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: I have waited countless tables, tended numerous bars, and understand what tipping can mean as a poorly paid employee. Waiting tables was my primary source of income for a few years. Tips are a big deal.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Mary Jean from Chicago, IL

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:34 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: The quality of service at restaurants matters. If the service is less than stellar, I calculate the tip to as close to 15 percent as possible, and then, maybe cut some. If the service is spectacular, I ratchet it up to close to 25 percent. Otherwise, it’s 20 percent.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: My father taught me about tipping many years ago. He told me to leave the tip in cash, even when I am paying with a credit card.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: How does one determine what to tip the doormen and maintenance staff at Christmas?

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Sandra from Chicago, IL

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:33 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: I will usually tip 15 to 20 percent, but if the service is really horrible I will consider less. But, I believe we tip people because we fear what those around us will think if we don’t. The social fear is the main reason people tip.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: I have been reading this great book on tipping named “Keep the Change”. The author claims that tipping servers or waiters doesn’t really improve the service at all: we tip out of social fear or empathy or a superiority complex.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Chaz from Chicago, IL

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:32 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I start with 20 percent, generally, and depending on the quality of service it could go up or down. I’ve been known to tip 100 percent if the service quality is up to par.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: I’ve been a hairstylist for almost ten years and I’ve almost always worked at higher end salons that offer great customer service. Because of that I have become fond of a certain level of service. However, as long as I’m treated accordingly I make sure my service provider is well taken care of.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: Twenty percent is a starting point, people and if you can’t afford to tip then you shouldn’t be getting serviced.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Edwin from Boise, ID

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:31 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Unless the sever is really bad I will always tip 10 percent or more. Normally I will tip 15 percent in restaurants, even the ones that request more (Sorry, I am just old-school).

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: I have known servers and most tell me that they can make over $100 working in a good restaurant in a short shift (less than 6 hours). While that may not be great in San Francisco, that is good money here in Idaho.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I worked in restaurants when I was younger and have seen firsthand the hard work that it is, but I still tip the way I do because I am not rich, If I were better off, I may tip more.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Lynn from Snellville, GA

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:30 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I base it first on percentage (18 to 24 percent). The percentage I give is almost completely based on the service I receive. I have even had occasion to inform management that the service I received was so poor that I’d like to select a different server (or member of their staff) to receive the tip on my meal.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: In high school I had friends that were servers. My father entertained clients in bars and restaurants for many years and upon becoming old enough to visit restaurants on my own, he gave me a tip calculating card to keep in my wallet to ensure I’d leave proper tip for services received.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: Tipping has always served me well. I am well taken care of in restaurants I frequent as the wait staff knows I tip well, and even better when given excellent service.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Oscar from Decatur, GA

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:29 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Quality of service rarely informs the amount I tip. If I have a bad day I still make a full day’s wages. If a server has a bad day they may not be able to make rent. As someone who has serving experience I always tip 20 percent, if not more.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: I worked two service jobs while going to school full time. It can be a physically and emotionally draining job, so I always try to tip well.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Kelli from Marietta, GA

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:28 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Dining In: Greater of 20 percent or $2 unless the service was bad for no apparent reason other than being a single diner. Grooming Services/Delivery: 10 percent. Takeout at sit down restaurants: Greater of 10 percent or $1. If I have to carry my food in a restaurant, I don’t tip.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Mary from Atlanta, GA

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:27 AM

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: I lived in Europe. Tipping there is just a little thanks and never expected. People are just paid to do their jobs. Here, they expect a tip good service or bad.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I just had a similar conversation with a taxi driver. I think he was mad when I only tipped him 20 percent on a ride to the airport for business. On the pay screen there was a button for a 40 percent tip. Had I not already been paying the cc fee maybe I would have tipped more but it’s presumptuous for people to think business transpires should pay more. We’re on tight budgets. That’s how we become profitable.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Jaclyn from Miami, FL

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:26 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: I tip $1 per alcoholic drink. I end up getting faster and more reliable service from the bartenders.

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: The level and quality of service absolutely determines the outcome of a tip for me, except for some mundane services such as taxi cab rides.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: I have had friends that were waiters that couldn’t get by on just their salary and have told me about what they have had to sacrifice when people don’t tip well. I was also told by my grandmother the “proper etiquette” for tipping.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Richard from Washington, D.C.

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:25 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Service matters. If it’s great, I may give over 20 percent. if it’s good, 20 percent. If not so great, 15 percent. If poor, 10 percent. (This is for dinner.) If I have a personal connection with the person, I leave a lot more. For example, my barber: I’ve been going to the same guy every month for six years. We talk about our kids, about football, etc… On a $19 haircut, I give him $25. His kids’ college costs the same as my kids’ college, but I make four times as much as he does.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: My father used to double the tax in New York City restaurants. This produced a precise 15 percent tip. I watched him do this all through my childhood. So, I always left 15 percent. When my parents took my wife and I out for dinner, as we left the restaurant, my wife would always slip a few dollars on top of the receipt because she thought what my father left wasn’t enough. Eventually, I learned to just leave 20 percent. That made my wife happy, and eventually, once I felt I could afford it, it made me happy, as well.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: It was funny to see the question about the $20 dinner. I haven’t had one of those since moving to D.C. six years ago. There is no $20 dinner here unless you eat off the children’s menu.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Jan from Cos Cob, CT

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:24 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: The quality of service always comes into play. I generally go with 20 percent but will go higher for exceptional service. If a religious holiday is coming I tip higher.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: I travel a lot and appreciate good service. I spent over 100 nights in hotels last year. When the hotel staff, restaurant employees, rental car bus drivers, and taxi drivers go all out for me, I reward them.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: My dad is a cheap tipper, and I secretly add to the tip when he is not looking.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Dave from Ridgefield, CT

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:23 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: After I’ve drunk the alcohol, I get more generous.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: For a restaurant, I start at 20 percent and then deduct for bad service, to a minimum of 15 percent. But that rarely happens.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: I read Barbara Ehrenreich’s “Nickel and Dimed” and was shocked by the hard lot of the hotel housekeeper. Now I tip $5 per night and leave a note saying thank you in three languages.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: There are tricks food servers can use to extract more tips. There is research on this, and I’m surprised more servers don’t employ them. Also, I rarely tip at Starbucks or ice cream stands. It’s a retail operation, not food service. Should I also tip the dry cleaner or newsstand operator?

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Arri from Wallingford, CT

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:22 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: The level and quality of service most certainly enter the decision. If i receive genuinely exceptional service I like to tip between 20 and 25 percent at a restaurant. However, if the server is rude, never comes to check on us, or is hurrying us along to flip the table, I give 15 percent or lower.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: I have worked in restaurants and coffee shops and always had the mentality that the tip should not be expected but earned. If I gave bad service, I could expect a bad tip, and that has served as my guide as I go out.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: Why is there now tipping for every service? Why is there a tip jar at the drive through at Starbucks? They pay their employees more than the minimum wage. It’s already a $4 cup of coffee.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Runton from Colorado Springs, CO

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:21 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: If I get outstanding service, I usually tip 25 to 30 percent. If I get good service, I tip 15 to 20 percent. However, if I get poor service, a server who just does not care or is downright rude, I will tip between nothing and 5 percent, and I do not feel bad about it at all.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: I worked as a host, busser and cook at a steakhouse during high school, and again as a server after I got out of the Army. I always had the mentality that I had to work hard to earn my tip, and because of that I regularly got 20 to 25 percent. I do not think that it is acceptable for servers to feel that they are entitled to a 20 percent tip for average service.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I don’t take cabs more than once or twice a year, but when I do I usually give a 20 percent tip. I don’t use room or bell hop services at hotels. I don’t tip at coffee shops because, as far as I am aware they are getting paid a non-tipping wage (if I have change from a bill, I’ll usually drop that in the bucket though). I have the same feeling towards room cleaning services. I travel all over the country for work, and do not see tipping envelopes in about half the hotels I stay at.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Chris from Aurora, CO

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:20 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I tip 15 percent at restaurants, which scales perfectly with inflation. Fifteen percent will always be 15 percent.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: I used to deliver pizza’s so I always tip my pizza driver, whereas if I don’t want to tip then I go pick up the pizza myself.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Chris from Santa Clara, CA

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:19 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I generally tip around 20 percent (often rounding to the nearest dollar) unless there’s a significant problem with service or quality.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: Awareness that I make a lot more than most service industry folks, but I appreciate the hard work they do.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Shane from Monterey, CA

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:18 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I tip big (30 to 40 percent) on first round so they remember me. Then about 20 percent or $1 per drink. Whichever is highest.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: In college and shortly after, I worked in a fine dining establishment. I came to believe that people are paying for the quality food AND the quality service. I remember putting in lots of effort to help ensure they received both.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: If we tip to show appreciation for minor services like cabs and coffee, what about services with greater impact? Does one tip the surgeon who performed a great heart-bypass them? Tip the firefighter who saved your home? If a parent’s child shows growth far and above average ina certain teacher’s class and the parent credits the teacher, do the parents tip the teacher? The recipients of these services would seem to appreciate them far greater than their cab rides and coffee, yet I haven’t heard of a single instance in which these service providers were “tipped.”

    Perhaps tips are a recognition of the service and a recognition that the individual makes less than they should.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Megan from Redwood City, CA

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:17 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: Not on purpose — but if I get drunk, I tend to get more generous.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I start at 20 percent (on top of tax). Lousy service gets it taken down to 10 percent, but it really does have to be bad. If the server is downright nasty, I won’t leave anything, but I’ve only done that a couple of times.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: I’ve known and loved a lot of folks in service jobs over the years, and I know how hard it is dealing with the general population. It seems a lot of folks believe they can be rude, pushy, inconsiderate, selfish cretins as long as they’re paying for the privilege — I like to think I’m not one of those folks, and I’m happy to show my appreciation for good service by handing over my cash.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Bonnie from Glendale, CA

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:16 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: If I’m at a bar, I’ll typically leave $1 to $2 per drink (more for fancier mixed drinks and less for beer and wine). If it’s table service with food, it gets lumped in with the overall tip.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I usually tip 20 percent. If the server was rude or service was otherwise less than professional, I will tip less. Service has to be altogether terrible for a noticeable difference in amount, in which case my intention is to communicate to the server about their performance.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: I have a number of friends that work in the restaurant industry and understand that it is hard work and their livelihoods depend on their patron’s tips.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Jamie from Pasadena, CA

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:15 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: Yes. Generally a dollar every time they bring me a drink, as opposed to the total. It’s because cocktails have a pay-as-you-go type feeling and if you don’t tip the wait staff, they’ll never come back.

    Q: Do you calculate tip before or after tax?

    A: Before if I’m sober. After if I’ve had a couple.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: I have been both a cocktail and food waitress. I know that even a small $1 increase in a tip can make someone feel validated, and conversely, a measly tip can feel like a rebuke.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: Without exception, my friends that have worked for tips are way more fun to go out with. I feel incredibly uncomfortable if my companions are rude to the staff or fail to tip appropriately.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Heather from Los Angeles, CA

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:14 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I usually do 15 to 20 percent for food, go up or down depending on service and dining conditions (e.g. eating with a large groups of people.) For delivery, it’s usually 5 percent of the bill. For luggage, $2 per bag. I always tip for food, haircuts, and massages. I’m not sure in other situations — do you tip the furniture delivery people and the movers? If so, how much?

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: When I moved to LA, I didn’t know that you are supposed to tip the car wash guys. (I still don’t quite understand that; I don’t tip the dry cleaners — or I am being a bad tipper towards another set of workers?) So I started putting money into a tip jar at the pay counter, only to realize a few visits later that that money only went to the first guys who handled the car. Argh. Now I put a dollar into that can and a couple into the hands of the guy who finishes drying my car. Sometimes I wish I lived in Europe where the gratuity is included in the price.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Bernard from Altadena, CA

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:13 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: I’ve always been told it’s a buck a drink regardless of drink price.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Yes, the level of quality always influences my tip amount. Also, if I have my 2 and 4 year-old sons with me I’ll tip more (we tend to be messier when they’re there).

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: Only once have I left no tip. Just bad service all around. Rude, wrong order, and just smug the whole time.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • April from San Jose, CA

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:12 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: No, I tip as a percentage of the bill regardless of the food. The only difference would be if I were ordering a single drink at a bar. Whether it’s alcoholic or not, I tip a dollar for the drink.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I start by doubling the sales tax (about 9.75 percent in my county), then adjust up or down based on service. I will leave a zero tip if the service is truly terrible, but I’ve only ever done that two or three times.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I wish we didn’t tip at restaurants. It was great when traveling abroad to not have to worry about it (I went to Japan last year). This would mean, however, that restaurants would have to pay their waiters and waitresses more and would raise the sticker price on the menus.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Melany from San Diego, CA

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:11 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I never have service issues at the places I frequent, so it’s always 20 percent at a minimum. For new places, I do online research (e.g. yelp, google reviews, etc…). If the place is noted for slow/bad service I just don’t go. There are always alternatives.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: My father and boyfriend are generous to wait staff and I’ve learned from them. I’ve learned that if you don’t tip taxi drivers well, they won’t show up on time (or ever) when you make reservations with that same company at a later date.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • David from Hawthorne, CA

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:10 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I am not afraid to leave no tip if the service is bad, and I will leave extra (sometimes greater than 20 percent) for exceptional service. The main thing is the attitude of the server. If he/she is gracious and genuinely trying to help the tip will be better.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: I was at a restaurant where a manager came out after dinner and asked about the service - it seemed the table had left less than 15 percent. When we said the service was OK she told us the “industry standard” was 15 percent. Her attitude was very condescending. We were furious and have never been back to that restaurant.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Andri from Prescott, AZ

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:09 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: The percentage I tip is largely based on the type of service. I would normally tip about 18 percent for a sit-down meal and 10 percent for a cab ride. The tip is adjusted from there based on the quality of the service.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: I grew up in a country (Iceland) where tipping is considered poor taste at best and insulting at worst. I’ve had to learn by asking friends and sometimes the service providers themselves. I still try to pick up the nuances of tipping by watching others. I still don’t understand how to tip for haircuts. Is it based on the conversation with the hair stylist?

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: Tipping seems like an effective incentive for social harmony. At the same time, it seems like the symptom of a society where one cannot trust in the good will of others.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Resha from Tucson, AZ

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:08 AM

    Q: How do you make your tipping decisions?

    A: I tip based on local wages. In Arizona, tipped employees make less than minimum wage — up to $3 less according to the current law. Not all employees are aware that their employer is required to make up the difference or may feel in danger of losing their job if they ask for this difference.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: I worked as a waitress for six months after college. I noticed that people from out of state (and other countries) did not appear to be aware of this alternate minimum wage and left very little or no tips, presumably thinking that the staff was paid by the restaurant. I was able to earn enough money to live on primarily due to the regular customers who tipped 20 percent or more.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Linda from Scottsdale, AZ

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:07 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I always tip 20 percent, unless waiter has been exceptional. If service has been horrible — long wait without acknowledging us, asking for something and then forgetting, etc. — I reduce the tip to 18 percent.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: I was a waitress in my college days and know the amount of work and hassles involved. Wait staff are either college students or people who are working hard to provide for their families. They deserve to be treated fairly. However, if I get a shampoo before the haircut and a quick wash after, I’ll tip 20 percent.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I tend to not put money in tip jars found at many fast food places — mostly because I’ve seen others conveniently remove money from them for their own use. If I’m going to tip, I either put it on the credit card or hand the tip to the person directly. I’ve also found that tipping a store employee for outstanding service is much appreciated. I usually buy gift cards for that store (Macy’s, Kohl’s, Whole Foods) and hand it to them if someone has gone out of their way to help me.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Lauren from Lake Village, AR

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:06 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: It makes a difference to me if the person who served me gets the tip or the tips are pooled. I tend to tip individuals more highly.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: I’ve worked in retail in the past, in times of need. As a result, I have some experience with the public. I tend to tip restaurant workers well because I know they have to put up with a lot of customers that tip little or nothing.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: I don’t tip cab drivers unless I have luggage. Then I tip at least $1 per bag.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Angelea from Little Rock, AR

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:05 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Service is always a factor. Recently, we had a waitress who clearly hated her job and hated us for being there. We ran up a $25 bar tab and I tipped her 10 percent to send her a message. I don’t think I could ever tip zero, but I can tip low.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: We have friends that work in the bar industry, so we know that our tips are vital to their livelihoods. I enjoy giving a good tip to someone who has taken care of us.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: We practice “Christmas tipping” in December. We make sure to carry $20 bills with us and when we get exceptional service somewhere, we leave them a $20 with a Merry Christmas note. My parents started this and our family has carried on the tradition. We’ve had people chase us out the door to thank us. It’s nice to be able to bring joy especially in what can be a stressful time of year. In our favorite local restaurant, we also tip $20s to people who waited on us during the year, the hosts, the kitchen crew and the bartender. That pays priceless dividends throughout the year.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Daniel from Little Rock, AR

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:04 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: I start with 20 percent, round up to the nearest dollar and subtract for poor service or food. Or I may throw in a couple dollars more if it looks like the wait staff is having a bad day or if I’ve tied the table up for a long time.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • David from Sand Point, AK

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:03 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: Typically I try to tip well to hotel employees and food servers, who usually earn lower wages. They provide services that we take for granted and usually they don’t control pricing and aren’t tipped that well. I avoid places where they suggest the gratuity, because I think it is in poor taste. If a cab driver can get me to where I need to go in good time I’ll tip well.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: I can get a haircut in Red Bluff, Calif. for $10 and for $20 to $30 in Seattle, San Francisco or Anchorage. I generally won’t reward inflation or price fixing. However, if I get a shampoo before the haircut and a quick wash after, I’ll tip 20 percent.

    Q: Any other thoughts?

    A: Sometimes I’ll still tip 20 percent if the food is less than satisfactory. It’s not the servers’ fault, especially after they discount the food I didn’t eat. The only time that I don’t tip well is when the server carries an attitude.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Brian from Anchorage, AK

    • Posted by Public Insight Network Source
    • on July 1, 2011 12:02 AM

    Q: Do you tip differently for alcohol versus food?

    A: No. I always over-tip, because I never know what amount is appropriate.

    Q: Do you calculate the tip before or after tax?

    A: Alaska has no sales tax. Otherwise, I tip after.

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: The quality of service matters. My wife and I have base amounts. If the service was better than anticipated, the tip is larger.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: I have many family members and friends in fields where tipping is a large portion of wages.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

  • Eric from Fairbanks, AK

    • Posted by Matt Berger
    • on July 1, 2011 12:01 AM

    Q: How do you base your tipping decisions?

    A: When eating out, I tip between 15 and 20 percent, and generally a minimum of $1 per person in our party.

    Q: What personal experiences have influenced your tipping style?

    A: I have worked as a waiter, bellman and housekeeper. The tips paid are not proportional to the amount of work done. Housekeeping is the hardest of these jobs with hardly any tips, while bellmen don’t have to work hard at all but earn great tips.

    In May, we asked our listeners and readers how they decide what to tip for the services they use. More than 500 people responded to our survey. Many provided their personal experiences, strategies and rationales for how they handle this often confusing part of everyday life. Click here to see all the responses, and please visit our interactive map of tipping trends in the U.S.

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